The Pull – 1/17/18

Issues Pulled This Week:

The Snagglepuss Chronicles #1
Days of Hate #1
The Further Adventures of Nick Wilson #1
Batman #39
Kill or Be Killed #15

We’re back this week with a solid week of #1’s from Image Comics, a book I forgot to pick up a few weeks ago, Kill or Be Killed and Batman. I was going to try and keep it spoiler free this week, but this week was so great that I don’t think I can.

SO THAT BEING SAID.

THERE ARE SOME SPOILERS BELOW

SO IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THE ISSUES IN QUESTION

PLEASE TURN BACK NOW

OKAY, HERE WE GO!

Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles #1
DC Comics
Mark Russell and Mike Feehan

When I first learned that DC had acquired the rights to the old Hanna-Barbera line of cartoons, I wasn’t expecting much. That all changed when I read the Flintstones, which was my #3 comic of 2017, by Mark Russell. Russell takes these characters, that some of us are only familiar with because we watched Boomerang when we were kids, and puts them in situations that we can relate to as adults having grown up with these properties. The Flintstones was a satirical take on the Stone Age with modern issues ranging from marriage, PTSD, and Russell doesn’t stop with Snagglepuss.

I’ve been looking forward to this book for months and it did not disappoint. The pitch was putting Snagglepuss in the center of the McCarthy era as a Southern, closeted gay playwright. Having read Russell’s take on the Modern Stone Age Family, I was SOLD. He manages to make a character barely any of us can remember seem intriguing in an almost Great Gatsby grandiose sort of way. Even with this only being the first issue, there’s so much foundation laid out and so many layers to the story. We’re seeing Snagglepuss deal with being a closeted homosexual while his colleagues are being questioned by anti-communist search parties and we can’t forget the insane backstory that’s happening about a public execution as the story unfolds. It’s such a great first issue and I cannot wait to read more.
Days of Hate #1
Image Comics
Ales Kot and Danijel Zezelj

I normally never buy a comic just because of the cover art but I made the exception when I saw that Danijel Zezelj was involved because he did all of the art on one of my favorite comic series, Starve. This comic very much touches on the political and social climate we’re facing today with our current Commander in Chief. This takes place a few decades from now but makes many references to the alt-right and the election of 2016. It’s hard to tell where this is going in the beginning because of the vague start but from what I gather, racism is still a rampant issue in America in the 2030’s and there has since been another civil war between the alt-right and liberal Americans.

At the heart of this comic is a love story between two women who are torn apart by differing levels of dedication to their cause and how one of them has gone full guerilla warfare and the other chose to live a more modest life after their split.

As far as first issues go, this is just strong enough to keep me reading and I probably wouldn’t be saying that if it weren’t for the beautiful artwork and page layouts. The story has a great premise but it’s a little jumbled in the beginning and left me a lost until the middle.
The Further Adventures of Nick Wilson #1
Image Comics
Marc Andreyko and Steve Sadowski

You ever see the movie, Hancock? The one with Will Smith? It’s kinda like that except there’s no angel story to ruin it at the end.

This follows ex-superhero Nick Wilson as he comes to grips with no longer having his super abilities and having to work children’s birthday parties as an impersonator of himself to make ends meet. Not a lot stood out to me with this and I’m not sure what I was expecting given the cover art but I figured hey, it’s only a few bucks and I’m sure it’ll be a little funny. There are a few parts of this that are actually really funny but overall it just reads as a Hancock rip off that is a little less crude humor and a little more Seinfeld, which isn’t a bad thing. I’ll probably pick up the next issue to see if it gets any better considering it’s only a 5 issue mini-series.
Batman #39
DC Comics
Tom King and Joelle Jones

I’ve said this a hundred times and I’m sure every other blog has too, but man, Tom King can write the hell out of some Batman. We’re unfortunately at the finale of this SUPERFRIENDS arc and we’re finally seeing Wonder Woman enter the mix. For the last few issues, the focus has been on the friendship and the eventual double date of Superman, Batman, Lois Lane and Catwoman. This last issue wraps everything up so well and leaves us with a cliffhanger that has me itching for two weeks to pass by just so I can see what finally happens.

This issue has it all. Classic Jim Gordon Bat Signal trickery, inter-dimensional horde battles and awkward sexual tension between the Caped Crusader and Diana. The entire issue has us wondering if the bond that Cat and Bats share is strong enough to withstand time apart and even old flames. It’s an incredible issue that once again showcases King’s ability to humanize these larger than life characters and put them into situations that almost anyone can relate to.

Kill or Be Killed #15
Image Comics
Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips

The single best current series going right now. Hands down. The inner dialogue mixed with the 4th wall breaking and the constant twists make this the best book on the shelves. There hasn’t been a bad issue and I don’t think there ever will be. Brubaker has a way of telling a supernatural story and not letting it come off ass campy and that’s a difficult task in this genre. Sean Phillips’ art compliments Brubaker’s storytelling so well that it’s no surprise how critically acclaimed the duo have been in the past. This is my favorite effort if there’s to date and if you aren’t picking it up, I urge you to buy the trades and read it. You won’t be disappointed.

That’s all for this week!

I’ll be back next week with reviews of Doomsday Clock, Southern Bastards, and Redneck!

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