11 Geeky Ways To Say “I Love You”

11 Geeky Ways To Say I Love You
Image Created by Kris Madden

Why not just make 10 the highest? Because this list goes to 11.

In this list, we’ll be cranking up the dial on professing your love to someone in the geekiest ways possible—starting with the most familiar and colloquial ways to tell someone you love them all the way up to the elitist geekiest nerdiest way to say those sacred three words.

1. The Definitive Mix Tape (Or Spotify Playlist)

I Love You Mix Tape
Image Created by Kris Madden

It’s an activity that anyone can do and requires only an ear and access to music—which is pretty accessible these days. The “I Love You” mixtape can include several variations on the theme all of which essentially say:

  • “This song makes me think of you.”
  • “This song will tell you why I love you.”
  • “This song shows you how much I love you.”
  • “This song is on here because I know you love it. And even though I can’t stand it, I’ve included it here just to show you much I love you.”

Of course, the variables of included songs are dependent on the uniqueness of the couple, which means the possibilities for track selection go on forever.


2. “I Love You” with Infographic Data

Things Meatloaf would do for love infographic
Image Created by Kris Madden

The infinite wisdom of Steinman and Meatloaf is displayed beautifully in the above graphic and what better way to say, “I love you” than with the gift analytical data, which objectively proves scientifically the feelings you feel for the special someone in your life.

Pie charts, line graphs, dot matrices, and the like are the visual keys to communicate the data of your heart. So if you’re spreadsheet super-fan or a database genius, use that brilliant mind of yours to show that special person how much you care about the stuff that really matters: hard data.


3. “I’m Your Density”

back to the future george mcfly i'm your density destiny
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A quote from your favorite movie the two of you share with each other. This line comes from the first installment of Back to Future, where a bumbling George McFly attempts to tell his potential-future wife that he’s her destiny, but obviously flubs the line due to his nervousness.

Essentially, you’re looking for an inside joke that only the two of you get from a source the two of you are passionate about.


4. Link Capturing Zelda’s Heart

Zelda heart I love you
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Video game references continue to gain popularity to the point where even your standard layman-on-the-street has a basic understanding of the Zelda franchise.

Throw in some pixel art, caption a frame from your favorite game, and tell your significant other what they mean to you.


5. “I love you” with a Scientific Calculator

Scientific calculator i love you
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“n-3^07-!”

This non-sensical equation doesn’t look like much when written right-side up, but when turned upside down, the phrase, “I love u” appears. And after all, the love between two people often doesn’t make a lot of sense to the people around them, so it makes sense this little equation would work out similarly.

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6. “I love you” in Shyriiwook AKA Wookie AKA Chewbacca

Wookie Say Anything I Love You
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In researching Shyriiwook, I could find no specific way to say the phrase, “I love you.” So what you’re after here is your best Wookie impression growl—ideally with that mahogany-like timbre that Chewbacca commands with his most emotionally-fueled bellows. And if you need help structuring your growls, Wookietranslator.com can help you with that, and to save you time, the TK way to say, “I love you,” is: “Huurh Awwgggghhh!”

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7. “I Love You” in Binary

I Love You in Binary Code
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These little ones and zeroes translate to the phrase, “I love you.” The only thing that matters is the order of those numbers, so feel free to arrange them in any way you see fit. And if you just want the binary code for the phrase with character spaces, it would be:

01001001 00100000 01101100 01101111 01110110 01100101 00100000 01111001 01101111 01110101

REFERENCES


8. “I Love You” in Sindarin AKA “Elvish”

Lord Elrond Elf i love you tengwar sindarin
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In Sindarin, the formal translation of the phrase is “Le Melin.” The image depicts the phrase written in Tengwar, which is the Tolkien-created script used in several different languages in Middle Earth.

REFERENCES


9. “I Love You” in Klingon

Klingon Worf saying I love you or you are my beloved
Image Created by Kris Madden

Wait, “BangwI’ SoH,” doesn’t mean, “I love you” in Klingon—why do you have Worf saying that?

You got me. “BangwI’ SoH,” means “You are my love.” I chose this form of the phrase because its origin is attributed to the creator/inventor of the Klingon language Marc Okrand. Modern-day Klingonists have opted to use the phrase, “qamuSHa’,” which literally translates to “I undo-hate you.”

From my understanding, this stems from the lack of a verb form for the word, “love,” so in order to create the word, Klingonists combined the word for “hate,” which is “muS,” with the verb suffix for “undo,” which is “Ha.” This phrase has its own poetic quality in that it expresses Klingonists’ desire to undo any hateful feeling, thought, or action towards the person to which they are speaking.

REFERENCES


10. “I Love You” in Vulcan

Spock says I love you in vulcan
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While Vulcan isn’t as definitive as other languages that originated from the Science-Fiction & Fantasy genre, when you have the con and it’s time to engage, it’s still endearing to profess your love with the immortal words: “Ashau nash-veh tu.”

While there are several variations on this phrase, this version uses the Vulcan Dictionary paired with the linguistic grammar lessons provided by The Vulcan Language Institute.

In case you’re wondering, in Vulcan, sentences are arranged with the verb first, followed by the subject, and then the object that is being acted upon. In this instance, the verb form of the English word “love” translates into the Vulcan word “ashau.” The English word “I,” and sometimes noun phrase “This one,” translates into “nash-veh.” And the last little tricky part is using the singular form of the word “you” in Vulcan. It’s tricky because depending on the previous word in the sentence the word form can either be “tu” or “du.” “Tu” is used when the previous word ends with a vowel sound and “du” is used when the previous word ends with a consonant sound.

So to sum up, “I love you,” would be “Ashau nash-veh tu,” but “we love you,” would be “ashau etek du,” because of the consonant sound present in Vulcan word for “we.”

REFERENCES


11. “You’re My 42”

Hitchhiker's Guide to The Galaxy 42
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The quintessential way to find your soulmate as a HG2G fan is to tell your significant other, “You’re my 42.” This could also be used as a litmus test to see if he/she is worthy of a second or third date.

If your partner’s response is, “What? I don’t get it,” then they’re probably not familiar with Douglas Adams‘ essential Science-Fiction absurdity known as The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. In the series, a supercomputer is created to Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything?

The answer: 42.

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Author: Kris Madden

Kris Madden is an American professor, writer, and artist whose work has garnered press and media attention from the likes of The Independent, Lifehacker, and Boing! Boing! among others. In the past, he has written for network blogs GearLive, FlushLife and PeevishPenman. His short fiction has appeared in Astonishing Adventures and in 2010, his short memoir was a winner in the William Saroyan Writing Contest. He currently lives in Fresno, California with his wife and three kids.

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