Jessica Jones Season 2, Episode 8: “AKA Ain’t We Got Fun” Review

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Jessica Jones promotional art cover for episode 208 “AKA Ain’t We Got Fun.” Photo courtesy of Netflix.

**This Article Contains Spoilers for Jessica Jones Episode 208 and Episodes Prior**

“When I look at you, I don’t see my mother.”

We got the mother-daughter bonding that we were denied previously! Both Krysten Ritter and Janet McTeer excelled as they navigated through their emotionally strained and confusing reunion. Watching Jessica simply not know what to do or how to act was great. How could she? Her mom is back from the dead, but is also the same monster Jessica has been hunting. How does one handle that? I enjoyed the unpredictability of it all. The impulsiveness of Jessica taking Alisa to her place, and her inability to solve the problem at hand made for an engaging struggle. I am surprised though that they have grounded Jessica’s anger around Alisa lying about being dead, instead of around Spencer, whose sudden importance was seemingly completely forgotten.

I think this episode really sold not only Janet McTeer as Alisa, but her as the season’s conflict.  Watching her in this episode I was constantly on edge—much like Jessica was. You just never know where she might snap, or what choice she might make in any given situation, or if there are any ulterior motives at play.  I was almost taken aback whenever she cracked a joke, played nice, or even smiled. Much like Jessica, I’d been shown that this woman is a monster. But no, she is a fractured woman. One who has wanted nothing more than to meet her daughter. Yet, she is the same person who has ripped people to shreds.  But is she at fault? Is she really a bad guy, or is she simply burdened like Bruce Banner (but with an evil Hulk)?

Karl didn’t stick around too much in this episode, but he—and IGH by extension—remains intriguing.  I had thought his relationship with Alisa was closer to a creepy doctor-patient type, but they have formed what seems to be genuine bond.  Karl continues to come off as someone who truly believes he is doing great things—and by all accounts he seems to be. Yes, his methods are unquestionably bad, but his intentions and motivations seem to be as far from evil as Jessica herself. Is IGH truly this terrible company that we think it is? There must be some important information that they are withholding, right?

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Rachel Taylor as Trish Walker (left) and Eka Darville as Malcolm Ducasse (right). Photo courtesy of Netflix.

Then there is Malcolm, who made huge steps forward for his character.  Not only did he call Trish out for her addiction (which I completely called), but he even took over Hogarth’s case. He handled it with grace too, as he cleverly turned the partners against each other, while getting the dirt that Alias Investigations needed. I was proud of Malcolm for being so headstrong, and continuing to get in front of his addict tendencies.  But then, Trish got in the way.

Trish’s journey was my favorite part of the first few episodes, but now she seems to be dragging down the proceedings. She is just running around getting in everyone’s way, and now she is bringing others down with her. After finding the brawl she was looking so hard for, she pressured Malcolm into taking her inhaler.  I was nearly yelling at the TV. I knew Malcolm would take a wrong turn somewhere, but I didn’t think it would be with Trish. My initial feeling as it was happening was disappointment, but then Malcolm immediately turned against Trish. He knew he messed up, and he instantly saw the toxicity that is currently oozing from Trish.  I can only hope Malcolm continues down a positive path, even though that path just got a lot tougher.

Hogarth made strides in her journey to a cure as she met with the healing man that Inez told her about. Even though that same man freaked out on her, Hogarth’s hopefulness was only strengthened. The simple truth that there is a way was enough. Also on Hogarth’s mind, Inez. I could sense that the show was building to this moment, and it didn’t feel forced. Their back and forths have always had a tension to them, so this seems to be a natural step forward. I did really enjoy Hogarth knocking Inez off of her pedestal by revealing her own small beginnings. It’s a powerful detail that shows how strong and determined Hogarth is.

“AKA We Ain’t Got Fun” was easily the strongest overall episode we’ve had in awhile.  On almost all fronts the episode excelled—even if Trish did get in the way a little. Janet McTeer is carving out a memorable place within the show, and her character is frighteningly unpredictable. I have no idea where the show is going, but as Jessica said, there is no version of this that ends well.

What did you guys think of the episode?  Make sure to leave your thoughts down below in the comments! But please make sure to keep it spoiler free of any future episode information.  For all of our Jessica Jones Season 2 coverage and reviews in one place, make sure to check out our HUB!

Bonus Notes:

  • I think this episode must have had the biggest MCU reference since this all started.  The Raft! This must also be the first Netflix show that takes place post Civil War.
  • I can’t help but note, Jessica was in a very similar position around this time last season with the antagonist of the piece.
  • What would be great, and very Typhoid Mary-like, is if Alisa’s angry self actually had a formed personality.
Jessica Jones 208 Poster
Jessica Jones promotional art cover for episode 208 “AKA Ain’t We Got Fun.” Photo courtesy of Netflix.

 

Jessica Jones Season 2 is now available to stream exclusively on Netflix. 

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Author: Russ Milheim

I'm Russ, and I'm a nerd to the core. Pop culture is the fuel that drives me. Television, Movies, Games, Comics, and Superheroes are my passions in life. Want to talk anything DC or Marvel? I’m here for you. Like Funko Pop! figures? Those are my thing as well. The moral of the story, is that I felt Game of Nerds was the best place to try and share my love for all things pop culture to the world, and engage with people across the world.

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